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AUSTRALIE - OCÉANIE


AUSTRALIE


344 FREYCINET, M.L. Carte Generale de la Nouvelle Hollande. Paris, 1811. Uncoloured. Several foldings as issued. Printed on heavy paper. Repair of one minor paper thinness on old foldings. Some very minor discolouration in lower part center fold. An attractive example of this important map. 491 x 731 mm.
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¤ Fine map of the continent of Australia prepared by Louis Freycinet during his voyage under Captain Thomas Baudin in 1800-1803. Freycinet's map of New Holland was the first 'complete' map printed of the Australian coast.
In the bottom left corner are shown the three ships of the Baudin voyage, Géographe, Naturaliste, and Casuarina. The longitude is calculated from Paris.
Engraved by P.A.F. Tardieu, Paris, Place de l'Estrapade No.1.

Although Matthew Flinders was the first person to circumnavigate Australia, in Her Majesty’s ship the Investigator between 1801-1803, ironically it is the French who lay claim to publishing the first complete map of the Australian continent. Freycinet’s map was published in France in 1811 three years before Flinders’ own chart and appeared in the official account of the 1801-1804 French voyage to Australia commanded by Nicolas Baudin.

Baudin’s exploits in Australia commenced some seven months before Flinders arrived from Spithead in the Investigator. Rather than head for the uncharted south-east coast, Baudin instead sailed north up the west coast of Australia, occasionally landing at points previously uncharted by the earlier 17th century Dutch navigators, finally arriving at Timor. Meanwhile Flinders had set out from Cape Leeuwin in an easterly direction, with the intention of circumnavigating the continent. When Baudin eventually made it to the southern coast of Australia, Flinders had already charted a great deal of the previously uncharted south-eastern coast.
The two parties finally crossed paths at Encounter Bay (east of Adelaide) on 8 April 1802. Baudin had managed to chart only a small 200-mile section of the coast west of Wilson’s Promontory.
Although France at this time was at war with England, Flinders had been promised safe passage back to England. On his return however he was imprisoned by the French on Mauritius and held captive there for six and a half years.

Meanwhile the Baudin expedition had returned to France and the subsequent account of the voyage was published from 1807 onwards by Peron. In 1810, Peron died and Freycinet took over the task of completing the account. In 1811, Freycinet released the second part of the atlas, which contained this general chart of Australia. Flinders on the other hand had to wait until 1814 before he could publish his own general Australian map.

As a further blow to Flinders’ psyche, the Baudin / Freycinet map of Australia ignored entirely the English contribution to the charting of the southern coast.
Fully aware of the discoveries made by Flinders and indeed Grant in Bass Strait in 1800, the French instead used their own patriotic names on the map to replace those given by Flinders and Grant. Many of the place names are given by Baudin.
(source : Simon Dewez, the Printed World)




345 FREYCINET, M.L. Carte Generale de la Terre Napoleon (à la Nouvelle Hollande)... par M.L. Freycinet an 1808 Paris, Imprimerie Royale, 1811. Uncoloured. Fine uncoloured condition and strong impression. Several foldings as issued. An attractive example of this important map. 493 x 755 mm.
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¤ Fine map of part of Australia prepared by Louis Freycinet during his voyage under Captain Thomas Baudin in 1800-1803. The longitude is calculated from Paris.
The cartouche on this map feature Napoleon himself in the upper right hand corner, and a natural history scene revealing the wonders of this previously un-recorded coastline, in the lower left hand corner including the La Geographe and La Naturalist sailed during the voyage.
Engraved by P.A.F. Tardieu, Paris, Place de l'Estrapade No.1.

Although Matthew Flinders was the first person to circumnavigate Australia, in Her Majesty’s ship the Investigator between 1801-03, ironically it is the French who lay claim to publishing the first complete map of the Australian continent. Freycinet’s map was published in France in 1811 three years before Flinders’ own chart and appeared in the official account of the 1801-1804 French voyage to Australia commanded by Nicolas Baudin.

Baudin’s exploits in Australia commenced some seven months before Flinders arrived from Spithead in the Investigator. Rather than head for the uncharted south-east coast, Baudin instead sailed north up the west coast of Australia, occasionally landing at points previously uncharted by the earlier 17th century Dutch navigators, finally arriving at Timor. Meanwhile Flinders had set out from Cape Leeuwin in an easterly direction, with the intention of circumnavigating the continent. When Baudin eventually made it to the southern coast of Australia, Flinders had already charted a great deal of the previously uncharted south-eastern coast.
The two parties finally crossed paths at Encounter Bay (east of Adelaide) on 8 April 1802. Baudin had managed to chart only a small 200-mile section of the coast west of Wilson’s Promontory.
Although France at this time was at war with England, Flinders had been promised safe passage back to England. On his return however he was imprisoned by the French on Mauritius and held captive there for six and a half years.

Meanwhile the Baudin expedition had returned to France and the subsequent account of the voyage was published from 1807 onwards by Peron. In 1810, Peron died and Freycinet took over the task of completing the account. In 1811, Freycinet released the second part of the atlas, which contained this general chart of Australia. Flinders on the other hand had to wait until 1814 before he could publish his own general Australian map.

As a further blow to Flinders’ psyche, the Baudin / Freycinet map of Australia ignored entirely the English contribution to the charting of the southern coast.
Fully aware of the discoveries made by Flinders and indeed Grant in Bass Strait in 1800, the French instead used their own patriotic names on the map to replace those given by Flinders and Grant. Many of the place names are given by Baudin.
(source : Simon Dewez, the Printed World).




346 LEVASSEUR, V. Océanie. Paris, 1850. In original o/l colours. Paper very slightly age-toned. For the rest in good condition. 288 x 425 mm.
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¤ A very decorative 19th century map of the Pacific Ocean, with hand coloured lines indicating the extent of Polynesia, Micronesia, Melanesia, and Malaysia (or Southeast Asia). The map is surrounded by portraits, animals, vegetation, etc.. by Raimond Bonheur, engraved by Laguillermie, blank verso. At the bottom of the sheet is an inset view of an island harbor and block of text entitled "Description Historique de l'Oceanie.
One of the last decorative maps of the area. From his Atlas Universel Illustré . Clancy, The mapping of Terra Australis, map 9.31




347 ANGAS, G.F. (The City And Harbour Of Sydney From Near Vaucluse.) London, J. Hogarth, 1852. In original colours. Original hand-coloured tinted lithograph op heavy paper. Artist names and captions below image, 357 x 600mm. The title and publishers details cut-off. Paper discolouration to margins from old mount, slight soiling overall, minor repairs to margins and image. The sky with some later colour addition. 335 x 580 mm.
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¤ One of the most sought after views of the city and harbour of Sydney seen from Near Vaucluse, 1852. Magnificent hand-coloured tinted lithograph and finished by gum-Arabic.
Underneath the print, several captions : "Rose Bay, New Gaol, Roman Catholic Cathedral, St. James Church, Wooloomooloo (sic), Colonial Hospital, Clark's Island, the Waratah, New Government House, Garden Island, the Banksia, Sidney (sic) Cove, Pinchgut Island, Paramata (sic) River, Shark Island, Bradley's Head, Blue Mountains."
Printer's and publisher's lines read "Thomas Boys, Lith. Published by J. Hogarth, 96 Mount St. Grosvenor Square, London, and Messrs Woolcott & Clarke, George Street, Sidney (sic), 1852."




348 STANISLAS (Frère). Principaux oiseaux de l’Australie dessinés sur nature par frère Stanislas, pensionnat des frères maristes. Sydney, c. 1900. In attractive strong original colours. Folio. Half red chagrin, spine with 5 raised bands gilt, title gilt on front cover. Binding slightly soiled and water staining on back cover. Foxing and brown staining throughout. Stamp on title-page : "Exposition universelle Paris-1900, union des frères enseignants, médaille d’or.". 590 x 440 mm.
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Unique album with a title in manuscript illustrated with 9 original gouaches of birds like bowerbirds, kingfishers and parakeets, according to the title drawn after nature and represented in their natural environment. Captions in Latin below each water colour. Plates mounted on guards and pasted on cardboard.

Featuring the most important birds of Australia prepared by the Marist Brother Stanislas during his stay in Sydney with the Marist Brothers.

The album was presented in Paris at the Universal Exhibition of 1900, and it received a gold medal.
An exceptional testimony of the ornithology of Australia at the beginning of the 20th century.

"The Marist Brothers is an international Religious Institute of the Catholic Church founded by a French Priest, St Marcellin Champagnat, in 1817.
The mission given by St Marcellin to his followers was to “make Jesus Christ known and loved”. This has been achieved over the last two hundred years by educating, forming and caring for young people. Schools have been a favored arena for the Brothers’ apostolic work.

In 1872 four Brothers arrived from Europe to form the first Australian community. Marist life and work flourished, and with the exception of Tasmania Marist Brothers have worked in every Australian State and Territory."


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